The Tree of Life in its various forms is recognized in all cultures as a symbol of immortality and eternal life. The tree of life is represented in several examples of sacred geometry and is central in particular to the Kabbalah (the mystic study of the Torah), where it is represented as a diagram of ten points

Sometimes called the cosmic or world tree, it did not originate with the authors of Genesis. For thousands of years it has been used in sacred literature to describe man’s connection with the divine. Although different cultures have known this tree by different names, the essence of this tree’s significance is essentially the same; it represents both divine and natural man, the spiritual and natural world. And just as the tree of life symbolically spans all the worlds of existence, so does man.

The Celtic tree of Life is often drawn showing the branches reaching skyward and the roots spreading out into the earth below symbolising the Druid belief in the link between heaven and earth.

Trees were an important aspect of Celtic Culture. They provided shelter and food, and warmth through fire wood. They also acted as a home for other animals, birds and insects. The Druids would hold their classes and meetings under the trees and, when clearing a settlement, the ancient Celts would always leave a tree standing in the centre.

Select your currency
EUR Euro
USD United States (US) dollar
FORGOT PASSWORD ?
Lost your password? Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.
We do not share your personal details with anyone.